Rya Yarn Supply at Byrdcall Studio Update

This is an important blog for anyone who is interested in my rya yarn supplies.  (If not, you won’t hurt my feelings if you skip this message.)  If you have my sample yarn cards, go get them and follow along with me.

pinksreds2The BIG NEWS is that I now carry every single color– 82 in all–of the Rauma Ryegarn from Norway.  I started slowly, but a year later my shelves are stocked with 5 or more of every color.  I reorder monthly so if you need more than I have, I can get what you need within 4-6 weeks. And I can send you what I have immediately to get you started asap.

These are the 82 Rauma Ryagarn color I have on hand.

These are the 82 Rauma Ryegarn colors I have on hand.  100 g skein. 2-ply.  75 M.    $16/skein.  Yarn sample card is $5.

soldout Lundgren copy

 

OK, Now pull out your Lundgren Rya yarn sample cards.  The yarn in the long skinny picture is sold out, but I have all the other Lundgren colors. (See at the bottom of this posting below)

This is the yarn that my grandparents had spun for them of New Zealand fleece by Harrisville Designs of Harrisville, NH.  No more of this yarn is being produced in the states. I still have thousands of skeins, but not in these colors.  If you are desperate for one of these sold out colors, feel free to ask me about it.  I may have a cut skein somewhere that I can offer you.  And I can definitely make a suggestion as to a substitute.

If you have your Lundgren Yarn sample card in hand, I suggest that you put an X through the sold out color numbers rather than removing the yarn.  If you leave the sold out yarn in the card, you can refer to that color when communicating with me.

If you don’t have a Lundgren Rya yarn sample card, I would recommend that you order my full line of rya samples.  I make this available for immediate sale at my etsy shop.  Click here to read more or to make a purchase.

The samples I send you include not only the yarn, but a variety of backing swatches to choose from as well as a detailed description and price list.

The next BIG NEWS of this blog is that I have now sold out of all of my Finnish Vuorelma yarn.  I only had about 8 colors in stock before they declared bankruptcy a year ago.  Very sadly this is one more Scandinavian Rya supply company that has succumbed to economical woes and lack of sales of rya supplies. (My guess.)  So if your yarn card has Vuorelma yarn on it, X them out.

And finally, I still have a solid supply of Asborya rya yarn from Sweden.  It takes me quite a bit longer to receive these Swedish yarns, but many of you love their softness.  In the yarn sample cards that I send via my etsy shop, I enclose a card of Asborya yarn samples.  As far as I know, no one else sells Asborya yarn samples.  They can be viewed online, or you can get the actual yarn to feel along with my rya samples.

Pirkanmaan Kotityo Oy Rya yarn samples - reduced

Pirkanmaan Kotityo Oy Rya yarn samples. Click on image to zoom in for detail.

I have bought rya backings from another Finnish supply company, Pirkanmaan Kotityo Oy.  I intend to purchase more of their backings and yarns soon.  This would be ideal for those making rya wall-hangings.  Here is what their yarn sample card looks like.  Heavenly colors.  A lighter weight yarn … so you can add more strands on the needle for endless possibilities for blending.  Acquiring more of their yarn will be a goal of mine for 2016.  Tell me below which colors you would be most interested in buying–no pressure or commitment!

Friends, this has been a long blog, so I appreciate your patience.  I just want to keep you informed of the status of your favorite yarns.  Please share with any other rya folks you know.  They will appreciate knowing what is available.

PS  For clarity, there is still plenty of Lundgren Rya yarn.  See image below. (Note: #91 sold out.)lundgren sample cards 12-2-15 copy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who dun it? Solve the Rya Mystery…

At this point, after hanging out in the rya world for 40-something years, I thought I’d seen it all.  Then my world is rocked, and I’d like your help to figure out this mystery.  After I sent out my last newsletter, I received an email from a woman named Eleanor whose sister has recently passed away leaving an almost untouched rya kit. Perhaps sensing my commitment to keeping the art of rya alive, Eleanor sent me all of her sister’s supplies. There was a graphed design, a threading card, a backing about 2′ wide and 4.5′ long, curved needles, and the most amazingly prepared yarn I’ve ever seen.  Who put this kit together? When?  What country were they from?  Where was their business located?  Why have I never seen this style of rya before?  Let me show you. . .DSCN7119

Here are the details for anyone who wants to ponder this.  The backing is typically Scandinavian with a dark wool thread woven in the weft every ten rows which makes counting the rows easy.2015-05-08 14.27.36 What I’ve never seen before is a dark linen thread in the warp woven to help you keep your place as you use the graph paper.  Brilliant!  Have you ever seen that weaving technique?  Tell me if you have. The other interesting thing about the backing is the knotting rows are closer together than in the typical Scandinavian backing. This is definitely going to be a dense rya.

Yet it is the yarn that really took my breath away.  Who ever put this kit together had high quality yarns and a skeining machine which could simultaneously blend many yarns together at the same time.  They selected various weights of both rya yarn with its rope-like twist and what I believe is dyed linen, and blended 3-6 strands all together on the skein.  So when you go to load your needle, you have the blending all right there at your fingertips.  I’ve never seen this before.  Gorgeous colors too!  Who on earth did this?DSCN7125

The threading card has the name Susan Hammal who I imagine is the designer of the pattern, “Earth & Sky” but could be the creative one who did the labor-intensive preparation of the supplies for a whole line of patterns. Does her name ring a bell?  Google was no help, so it’s been a while since she did this, I bet.   Look at the notes below  DSCN7121

Notice the words, “3/4″ & 1 1/2″ pile.”  I always teach to cut the loops unevenly, but that is quite a dramatic difference in the pile length.  I like it!

Eleanor thought that her sister had purchased the kit in New DSCN7123Jersey.  That is a clue, but still all basic questions unanswered.  There was a “ruler” with the kit to ensure that the knots were made at a uniform loop-length.  (My grandparents never used the rulers, and neither have I, but many people only make rya with a ruler.)

DSCN7129The curve-tip needles were a surprise to me.  A customer once asked me if I carried them, and I had to confess I had never heard of them.  I don’t think they are made anywhere on earth right now.  Please tell me if you have a source for them?  (Sorry, I’m going to keep these.)

While I knotted my recent Fireflower rya kit prototypes, I used the curved tipped needles.  I like using them, but the straight tipped ones really work just as well.

DSCN7120The only weird thing is that the graph doesn’t seem to have logical color blendings next to each other.  It’s too hard to explain, but at a glance I can see that Eleanor’s sister probably was frustrated by what could be a designer’s error.  Maybe you can see on the graph below that color blending #1 (whites) is shown in other areas with the #1 showing which would give no contrast of course and may have been a slip of the pencil when numbering the graph.  If only we had a photo of what the finished rya looks like, we could figure out the intended color scheme. (Oh, I may have just figured it out.)DSCN7124I’d love to find the time to piece this puzzle together.  What clues can you offer?  The red tag says “Norwegian Rya Rugs” but did they come from Norway in this format?  Or do you think Susan bought supplies from Norway, then created her own kits?  Ah, I can hardly sleep at night.

So I am comforted to know that another artist who went before me was doing the same thing I am working hard everyday to share with you.  Her kits were spectacular.  I just wish I knew more.  The blog here is a great way to share info with one another.  Your comment won’t show up immediately, but check back in later to see what others have said.  And a final shot of the gorgeous yarns: DSCN7122

Eleanor, thank you so much for sharing!

Melinda

Rya Lesson #5 with Bill and Emilie…

Bill and Emilie learn the rya knotting process for both left-handed and right-handed stitching.

Bill and Emilie learn the rya knotting process for both left-handed and right-handed stitching.

If you have been following the past four rya designing lessons, you can probably sense the joy I felt when the man who asked me to design this rya for him came to my studio in Maryland (from New Jersey) for a lesson and to bring his supplies home with him.

Over a year ago, Bill discovered me on the internet (as many of you have).  He had made a rya about 40 years ago and was searching for supplies and the perfect design for his second rya.  I helped him search by sending links to web sites with hundreds of rya photos.

Here is the pile gathered for Bill's rya project: Monet's Bridge.

Here is the pile gathered for Bill’s rya project: Monet’s Bridge.

Eventually Bill found a painting by Claude Monet of the bridge over the lily pond which had the colors and feel he was looking for.   He asked me to develop this design so he could create a rya for a wall-hanging.  Since I was getting deep into writing my book on “designing your own rya”, I told him I could, but it would be a while… I just had to get the book done first.  Then months later, I learned the lesson so many writers learn…not to rush the writing process.  So rather than make him wait many more months, I took on the project and started to do these lessons for you at the same time.  I hope some of you have found them to be helpful.

So yesterday, Bill and Emilie and sweet little dachshund, Chance, arrived at Byrdcall Studio to learn (or relearn) the process and everything they will need to do to complete the rug.  While I got Bill (left-handed) and Emilie (right-hand) oriented to the knotting process and graph reading, Chance rooted out and consumed all the feral crickets in Byrdcall Studio!

Bill getting more comfortable by the minute with the knotting process.

Bill getting more comfortable by the minute with the knotting process.

Bill and Emile are now starting on a new adventure and I am re-committing to getting this book written more now than ever.  Writing out these instructions here in the Byrdcall Blog has helped me to formulate some of the techniques I’ll put in the book…and I realized not to start you off with such a complicated design!  The rest of my designing lessons will be a piece of cake compared to this one.  But I am very proud of the design and confident that Bill and Emilie will have a spectacular 4′ x 6′ rya hanging on the wall within a year.

Simple set-up: a table, chair, and a hanging rack for the yarn.

They are ready to take the supplies home and create their own work space… Simply a table, chair, good lighting, and a hanging rack for the yarn.  And off they go!

Thanks for keeping up on the lessons.  Bill has promised to send photos of his progress.  I promise to get the book done, but not in 2014.

Thank you Bill and Emilie for letting me use your project as my on-line demonstration.  It has been FUN.

As always in my blogs, questions and comments are welcome.

Cheers!